About The EchoStar 11 Satellite

EchoStar 11 is an American communications satellite that was launched by the Sea Launch company on July 16, 2008. The 5.5 ton (with fuel), 20 kilowatt satellite is designed for a 15-year orbital service lifetime, and carries several Ku-band transponders to provide direct-to-home television service to Dish Network subscribers in the United States. The satellite orbits earth in a “geosynchronous orbit,” a special type of orbit that keeps the satellite in the same ‘fixed’ position above the western hemisphere. Orbital Parameters:
NORAD ID: 33207
Latitude:
Longtitude: 110°
Orbital Period: 1436.1 minutes
Perigee: 22,231 miles/35,777 km
Apogee: 22,243 miles/35,796 km
Inclination: 0.099999999977167°

About The DISH Earth Camera

Nearly six years after conception and after several months of testing, the DISH Earth camera, installed on a DISH Network satellite, delivers fascinating full-disk views of the planet from a distance of approximately 22,300 miles above the earth. It is the world’s first commercial communications satellite in geosynchronous orbit with a camera offering live video of the earth.


The camera was integrated onboard the EchoStar 11 spacecraft, a high powered satellite that sends video signals to DISH Network satellite TV customers. An uplink facility in Cheyenne, Wyo., maintained by EchoStar Technologies L.L.C., operates the camera and delivers the images to Space Services. EchoStar 11 satellite was launched to a geo-synchronous orbit at 110 degrees West Longitude in 2008.


The camera offers a 30 degree x 22.4 degree field-of-view for dramatic images of Earth and occasional views of the Moon and Venus. The regular night/day cycle, weather patterns, and seasonal changes in the western hemisphere are clearly visible in the continuous Earth view of North America, Central America and South America. The ‘eyes’ of the DISH Earth camera observes objects in the visible spectrum, similar to the human eye, with a resolution of about 20 km per pixel. The camera’s image rate is one frame per every 15 seconds.


The camera was developed in conjunction with EchoStar satellite engineers and teams from Ecliptic Enterprises Corporation and Space Systems/Loral.


Other camera facts:


  • Two identical cameras mounted in radiation-protective aluminum housing on spacecraft earth-face deck. Cameras have 12mm focal length lenses.
  • Resolution is approximately 25km/pixel and the output is 720 x 486 pixel NTSC.
  • Image quality and rate are configurable on-orbit, with 3 modes.
  • Modes for 400kbp/s (recommended default/clear sky), 150kbp/s (medium rain fade), and 25kbp/s (heavy rain fade)
  • Imagery is continuously archived at EchoStar’s Uplink Facilities.




Video Credit: EchoStar/Dish Network Video Credit: EchoStar/Dish NetworkView Full Size Video Credit: EchoStar/Dish NetworkView Full Size
Solar Eclipse 2010 - New!
Footage of Earth on July 11, 2010 durung the latest eclipse.
24 hr. time-lapse
An approximate 24-hour period was captured March 10, 2009, from 00:00 to 23:59 and shown at a fast rate. The Moon is visible after 45 seconds, traversing the field of view.
UFO?
On August 19, 2008, from 15:03 GMT to 15:14 GMT, the camera captured a large unidentified object as it sped between the camera and the Earth. Government officials have speculated that it could be space debris but its identification is unknown at this time. Tell us what you think the object might be.



 
Video Credit: EchoStar/Dish NetworkView Full Size Video Credit: EchoStar/Dish NetworkView Full Size  
Daylight rotation of Earth
An approximate 24-hour period was captured Sept.13, 2008, from 00:00 to 23:59 and shown at a fast rate. Venus is visible after 25 seconds, and the Moon is visible after 54 seconds, traversing the field of view.
Solar Eclipse 2009
Footage of Earth on the July 22, 2009 Eclipse
 

EchoStar 11 Photos
Sea Launch LP ES Launch Pad ES Camera 1 ES Camera 2
Photo Credit: EchoStar/Dish Network Photo Credit: EchoStar/Dish Network Photo Credit: EchoStar/Dish Network Photo Credit: EchoStar/Dish Network
       
EchoStar 11 ES in Nose liftoff ESXI on Google
Photo Credit: EchoStar/Dish Network Photo Credit: EchoStar/Dish Network Photo Credit: Sea LaunchView launch Photo Credit: Google Earth
    Liftoff of EchoStar 11 from the Sea Launch Odyssey platform floating at longitude 154° W on the Pacific Ocean equator at 05:21 UT/GMT (01:21 EDT) on July 16, 2008. Launch occurred aboard a Sea Launch Zenit-3SL rocket.  
       





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